City College of New York

English 110, Section TBD

Fall 2016

 

Cindelle Harris

Office Hours:TBD

Office:TBD

charris005@ccny.cuny.edu

Course Description

This course is designed to provide further practice of genres that will equip you throughout your college career, and most importantly, your professional life. Through reflection, analysis, reporting, arguing, and self-assessment, this course seeks to develop these key genres and expand on how you approach them. In addition to exploring these genres, we will also develop our research practices to make use of City College’s virtual library. We will consider the value of the digital platform to deliver these essays.

 

 

Writing should be a collectivistic effort when exploring your voice in your work and finding your confidence in your writing. This class will allow you to be open with your peers and your instructor about any questions or concerns that you might have in your writing process, all while developing strong habits and gaining insight on your work. This course will be workshop-based and discussion led. Iron sharpens iron, correct? Allow your peers, your instructor, and your craft to take the wheel this semester.

 

This syllabus presents a plan for the semester, but that plan can be changed if the need arises. Allow this syllabus to guide you through your assignments, readings, and expectations of this course.

 

Course Text

Bullock, Richard. The Norton Field Guide to Writing. 4th Ed. Norton.  


Recommended Text

 

 

Dunham, Steve. The Editor’s Companion. Writer’s Digest.

King, Stephen. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Scribner.

Pressfield, Steven. The War Of Art. Black Irish.

 

CCNY First-Year Composition Mission Statement

 

First-year composition courses at CCNY teach writing as a recursive and frequently collaborative process of invention, drafting, and revising. Writing is both personal and social, and students should learn how to write for different purposes and audiences. Since writing is a process of making meaning and communicating, FYC teachers respond mainly to the content of students’ writing as well as to recurring surface errors. Students should expect frequent written and oral responses on the content of their writing from their teachers and peers. Classes rely heavily on a workshop format. Instruction emphasizes the connection between writing, reading, and critical thinking; students should give thoughtful, reasoned responses to the readings. Both reading and writing are the subjects of class discussions and workshops, and students are expected to be active participants in the classroom community. Learning from each other will be a large part of the classroom experience.

 

 

Course Learning Outcomes

     Explore and analyze, in writing and reading, a variety of genres and rhetorical situations.

     Develop strategies for reading, drafting, collaborating, revising, and editing.

     Recognize and practice key rhetorical terms and strategies when engaged in writing situations.

     Engage in the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes.

     Understand and use print and digital technologies to address a range of audiences.

     Locate research sources (including academic journal articles, magazine and newspaper articles) in the library’s databases or archives and on the Internet and evaluate them for credibility, accuracy, timeliness, and bias.

     Compose texts that integrate your stance with appropriate sources using strategies such as summary, critical analysis, interpretation, synthesis, and argumentation.

     Practice systematic application of citation conventions.

 

Course Policies

 

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Any assignment in which there is plagiarized material will receive no credit. You are expected to read, understand, and adhere to CCNY’s Policy on Academic Integrity, which is available here: http://www1.ccny.cuny.edu/current/upload/Academic-Integrity-Policy.pdf .  

 

Attendance

Students are expected to attend every class session of this course and to be on time. If you miss five classes, your final grade will be dropped by one-half of one letter (a 90 to an 85, for example). If you miss six classes, your final grade will be dropped one full letter. If you miss seven classes, you will not be able to pass the course. Consistent late arrivals and early departures will have a negative impact on your grade. I will notify you by email if course absences (for full or partial classes) are having an impact on your grade. If you have special circumstances, please see me. I’m happy to work with you to help you complete this course.

 

 

Student Code of Conduct

http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/studentaffairs/community-standards.cfm

 

Food and Drinks

Please refrain from bringing any large meals to class. Light snacks and drinks that are not a distraction to class are permitted.

 

Resources

City College is committed to making your academic experience an enriching one, and should you find yourself in need of help, please make use of these resources:

 

The Writing Center

 

http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/writing/

The CCNY Writing Center offers a supportive learning environment where students can have one-on-one tutoring sessions with writing consultants. It is a great resource for you to obtain extra help as you write and revise your papers. They DO NOT proofread your papers, but offer assistance on improving certain aspects of them. They also offer ESL tutoring. To set up an appointment or semester-long sessions, contact them in person at the Writing Center, which is located in the NAC, 3rd floor plaza or call (212) 650-8104.

 

Gateway Advising Center, NAC 1/220

http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/gateway/

Students without a declared major can receive academic advising, especially if you have questions about your course of study, core requirements, etc.

 

 

AccessAbility Center Tutoring Services, NAC 1/218

 

http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/accessability/

Provides one-on-one tutoring and workshops to all registered students with learning or physical disabilities.

 

 

SEEK Peer Academic Learning Center, NAC 4/224

Phone: 212-650-5786; email: seekpals@ccny.cuny.edu

Offers counseling and peer tutoring for students in need of academic and financial support who have registered for the SEEK Program.

 

 

Essay Assignments

 

Throughout the semester, we will be focusing on three main essay assignments:

 

  • Literary Narrative

  • Exploratory Essay

  • Researched Critical Analysis

 

These three essays will be workshopped, critiqued, edited, proofread, and evaluated. It is important to note that these essay assignments will be part of a larger project and will be assigned to experience our course learning outcomes more effectively. All essay assignments should follow MLA formatting. You must turn in an electronic copy on Blackboard before class and a hard copy in class on the day papers are due.

 

After each assignment, you are required to write a short 2 page reflection, where you highlight the highs and lows of this assignment. Please be sure to include the following on each reflection:

 

-What did you learn from this essay? What has this assignment teach you about your writing? What would you have done differently?

-What was your favorite part of this assignment?

-What was your least favorite part of this assignment?

 

 

Literary Narrative (15%)

 

Essay #1: Writing a Literacy Narrative (Chapter 10)

2-3 Pages (750-1000 word count)

Due: 9/15

 

J.D Salinger, author of The Catcher in The Rye states,

 

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though.”  

 

Here, Salinger talks about the relationship readers have with books and the overall encounter that usually happens when a good book is ending. The relationship that one has with their favorite book is oftentimes much like this one and will forever leave a lasting impression.

 

Using the references from Chapter 10, write your very own literary narrative about a book or any other text that has been significant to you in any way. Has your reading or writing changed since then? What key element changed your way of thinking or altered your life perspective? Walk us through your experience, highlighting who you were initially before this book, the actual encounter with the story, and the lessons and teachings that you still hold true after you read this body of work.

 

It is imperative that you follow the tips and processes in Chapter 10 of  The Field Guide, as it will be the way in which your literary narrative will be scored upon. Paying close attention to the following questions will steer your writing in a unique way, and give the reader the best depiction of your narrative, through the experience you've had with a book:

 

  • Is the sequence of the narrative clear? Does it flow, and are there effective transitions? Does the narrative get sidetracked at any point?

  • Is anything confusing? Do I make sure that I have enough detail for a reader to understand my point?

  • Is there enough detail, but is it also interesting? Am I boring the reader to death? Will readers be able to visually see how much this body of work means to me? Would it help to add some dialogue so that readers can properly visualize and “hear” my narrative?

  • Have I made the narrative meaningful enough for readers so that they wonder and care about what will happen?

  • Is the significance of the narrative clear?

  • How is my ending? Do I leave my readers thinking? Is it a satisfying ending?

 

You are able to choose any book, passage, excerpt, poem, or literary piece that altered the way you felt about literature and ultimately altered the way you feel about yourself.

 

Exploratory Essay (15%)

Essay #2: Reporting Information (Chapter 12)

5-8 pages (1250-1500 word count)

Due: 10/20

 

Journalists, Historians, Sociologists, and Psychologists all have to produce reports and deliver information based on a particular topic. In order for these professionals to ensure that reader and listeners are getting the most accurate information, reporting information and taking out their opinions about the topic is extremely necessary.

 

In this assignment, you will find a topic that are currently affecting college students and your generation that others might not know too much about. In an ever changing world, you will be able to provide information to those who are knowledgeable on things like social media, technology usage in the classrooms, and the dynamics of being a college student.

 

For this essay, I want you to find at least three sources from magazines or newspapers on your subject. I want you to find them in CCNY’s virtual library. I’ll be able to tell, of course, because a correctly cited item will tell me the name of the database. I want you to use the database because the material you find in it has already been evaluated by experts, which isn’t usually the case on the open Web. You’ll also use the virtual library throughout your college career, so you should get an early start.

 

It is imperative that you follow the tips and processes in Chapter 12 of The Field Guide, as it will be the way in which your assignment will be scored upon. Paying close attention to the following questions will steer your writing in a unique way, and give the reader the best information that you have discovered for your topic:

 

●      Do you have a tightly focused topic? Have you kept your opinions out of the essay?

●      Did you cite at least three magazine or newspaper articles on your subject?

●      What strategies did you use to organize your essay? Comparison? Cause and Effect? Classification?

●      Did you define key terms or concepts?

●      Did you design your essay appropriately? Are there adequate visual elements? Have you considered the appropriateness of a Web text (for an essay that includes videos, for example)?

●      Did you edit your essay, eliminate typos, and remove grammatical errors?

●      Did you check your citations (both in-text citations and the works cited page) against the Purdue OWL?

 

Researched Critical Analysis  (20%)

Essay #3: Arguing a Position (Chapter 13)

Word Count: 2500

Due: 11/15

 

“Everything we say or do presents some kind of argument, takes some kind of position” (13)

 

Can you recall how many times you’ve gotten into a heated debate with someone and shared reasons why your way was the right way? Imagine using your writing to do just that: defend a position.

 

This assignment will expand upon your previous assignment, where you reported on a topic. Now, you will be able to use that topic and information and position your paper on an argument. Defending your work is extremely important. It not only shows the reader that you are capable of defending your position, but it allows you to apply some of your personal experience and ideas, with fact and information

 

Using your Reporting Information Assignment, you will now apply your topic and draft, and complete an essay where you review the information and express your position. It is imperative that you follow the tips and processes in Chapter 13 of The Field Guide, as it will be the way in which your assignment will be scored upon. Paying close attention to the following questions will steer your writing in a unique way, and give the reader the best information that you have discovered for your topic:

 

·  Does your paper have a clear and arguable position?

·  Do you provide relevant background information?

·  Do you give reasonable support for your conclusions?

·  Does your paper consider other positions? Have you included these arguments and used them as a way to strengthen your own position?

·  Does your paper have a thoughtful conclusion?

·  Does your paper have a cohesive structure? Does each new paragraph logically follow from the one that precedes it? Are logical connectives (since, because, therefore, etc.) used appropriately?

·  Is your writing clear and succinct? Is your writing grammatically correct and error-free?

 

 

 

Annotated Bibliography (10%)

 

The annotated bibliography is a collection of all of the secondary sources that you cited during the semester, throughout your Essay #2 and Essay #3 assignments.  In this assignment, you’ll list these citations in MLA format followed by a paragraph of summary. While you will have been working on formatting conventions all semester, this assignment provides you with an opportunity to really focus on this technical aspect of academic writing.

 

Word Count: Varies; the length of the bibliography will depend on the number of sources you use. The length of the annotation will depend on the length of the source.

 

Self-Assessment

Use the following criteria for assessing your bibliography. I’ll be using the same rubric when I grade the bibliographies.

 

     Have you checked and corrected the citation format?

     Have you adequately summarized the text, drawing from the entire source text and not just the first page?

     Have you edited the text for typographical and grammatical errors?

 

 

 

 

Portfolio and Self-Assessment Assignment (25%)

 

 

The portfolio and self-assessment are in many ways the most important documents that you’ll create for this class. Assembling the portfolio will help you to see your progress as a writer over the course of the semester; the self-assessment will give you the chance to evaluate that work based on your own criteria as well as the course learning outcomes.

 

The Self-Assessment will provide you with an opportunity to demonstrate that you’ve understood the rhetorical terms that we’ve been working with all semester—rhetorical situation, purpose, audience, genre, stance, media/design, and exigence—and an introduction to your portfolio. The portfolio should include, at a minimum, the Literacy Narrative, the Exploratory Essay, and the Researched Critical Analysis. Feel free to add additional documents to the portfolio, depending on what you need to demonstrate that you’ve understood the rhetorical terms and met the course learning outcomes. You might want to include drafts of essays, examples of your discussion board posts, your peer reviews, or something else not listed here. The Self-Assessment allows you to evaluate your work based not only on your own criteria but also on your learning outcomes. Here are the Course Learning Outcomes:

     Explore and analyze, in writing and reading, a variety of genres and rhetorical situations.

     Develop strategies for reading, drafting, collaborating, revising, and editing.

     Recognize and practice key rhetorical terms and strategies when engaged in writing situations.

     Engage in the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes.

     Understand and use print and digital technologies to address a range of audiences.

      Locate research sources (including academic journal articles, magazine and newspaper articles) in the library’s databases or archives and on the Internet and evaluate them for credibility, accuracy, timeliness, and bias.

      Compose texts that integrate your stance with appropriate sources using strategies such as summary, critical analysis, interpretation, synthesis, and argumentation.

     Practice systematic application of citation conventions.

 

In the self-assessment, you’ll demonstrate to me and to anyone else who looks at your portfolio that you have (or have not) understood the rhetorical terms and achieved these goals. The portfolio will not be evaluated on whether or not you have achieved the goals, but on how well you demonstrate your understanding of the rhetorical concepts and the goals that you have understood and achieved and your thoughts about the goals that you have not achieved.

 

To demonstrate that you have developed “reading, drafting, collaborating, revising, and editing,” you would want to include, perhaps, annotations from your bibliography or copies of the notes you took while reading to demonstrate that you have developed flexible strategies for reading. To demonstrate that your drafting process has changed, you might want to include (and refer to in your Self-Assessment) a draft from an early and a late assignment that demonstrate changes in your drafting process. To demonstrate that you have engaged in the collaborative and social aspects of writing, you might include in your portfolio a peer review that you wrote and one that you received. You would then describe these reviews, and their significance, in your Self-Assessment. Use this same approach for all of the Course Learning Outcomes. The Self-Assessment is a kind of research paper. Your development as a writer is the subject and the writing itself is your evidence. As you write your Self-Assessment, you’ll be referring to the works you’ve included in your portfolio.

 

Your discussion of the rhetorical terms will be up to you. You might want to devote a section of your self-assessment to this subject alone, or you might want to weave individual concepts—audience, for example—into a discussion of one of your essays that strongly demonstrates the concept.

 

The portfolio will be housed on a WordPress site. Be sure to make your portfolio private, accessible only by password. If you are concerned about privacy, consider creating an email account that you can use exclusively for course work. It will be read by me, some members of the class, and other CCNY faculty and administrators. You are, of course, free to share your portfolio with anyone else, but do not make it freely available. If you would like to opt out of creating a WordPress site, please let me know and we will arrange for you to make a portfolio in Blackboard. While the arrangement of the portfolio is up to you, it should be easy to navigate. As with any Web site, you want to be able to find what you’re looking for without any interference. This might mean scanning handwritten notes, taking screenshots of annotated Web sites, and turning your essays into .PDFs or Web texts.

 

Assessment Rubric

While you won’t be asked to assess your own Self-Assessment, you should be aware of the criteria that I’ll use when I assess it.

     Have you addressed all of the course learning outcomes, even those that you feel you did not spend enough time working on?

     Have you provided evidence, in the form of your own writing, that you have developed as a writer? Are you able to identify areas in which you have not progressed, either because you didn’t spend enough time with them or you feel that you had a strong start in those areas?

     Have you edited the Self-Assessment for typographical and grammatical errors?

     In your portfolio design, have you maintained consistency from one page to the next?

     Is your portfolio design simple and easy to navigate?

     Have you used color and contrast to make things simple for your reader?

     Have you considered font and page layout to create a neat, easy to read text?